Welcome!

To all those reading this I am David Gibbs; I am a Lecturer in Company and Commercial Law at the University of Hertfordshire.

I created this blog as a general out-let of ideas for my research, as well as keeping those interested up-to-date on my research and general interests.

I completed my PhD thesis at the University of East Anglia in 2014. The thesis was recommended for the award of PhD with no corrections. My external examiner was Prof. Simon Deakin (Cambridge) and internal examiner was Prof. Morten Hviid.
My PhD research centred on directors' duties and company law. The thesis was titled 'Non-Executive Self-Interest: Fiduciary Duties and Corporate Governance'. It was a doctrinal and empirical study on whether self-interest was suitably controlled amongst non-executive directors.

My supervisors were Prof. Mathias Siems, Prof. Duncan Sheehan, Dr. Sara Connolly and Dr. Rob Heywood

All opinions of any existing or future blogpost are my own. They do not necessarily represent the views of any of my associated institutions.
ORCID 0000-0002-6596-8536


Tuesday, 24 April 2012

What are my readers interested in?

OK, I may be turning the blogosphere in to something similar to Primark through this blogpost. But it is inspired from one of the blogs I follow, that of one of my supervisors throughout my PhD. His blog post looked at the stats of his followers, and so I aim to do the same.

So my audience are primarily from English speaking countries: (1) United Kingdom (3503); (2) United States (1295). After these two though there are perhaps surprising results with (3) Russia (457); (4) Germany (161); and (5) Malaysia (113). I would have predicted more results from countries such as Canada and Australia, but neither feature above 50.

So what posts are people interested? Well primarily it appears to be areas of European Company Law or perhaps more accurately the regulation of company law in Europe. Both my articles on the conference on European Company Law have received 352 and 262 views respectively. My post on the Companies Act section 175 makes up the top three posts with 203 views. This may predominately be due to its feature on the Lexis Nexis Community.

Looking at the page views after the last month it is unsurprising to see my recent, more substantial post, on outside directors at the top. However, this is joined by my most popular post on the conference on European Company Law both receiving 34 views in the last month. Based on my own observations on tracking I have noticed some other posts "trending" as it were. My post on derivative claims has received 20 views this month; whilst my posts on how to cite Hydrodan Corby has received 23 and my post on Christmas procrastination has received 33. The latter evidencing people's love for cartoons and procrastination? This post in total has received 126 views since it was first posted.

Dividing the total amount of views by the amount of months since they were posted my top five blog posts would appear in the following order: (1) Conference on European Company Law Stream 1 analysis (32); (2) Conference on European Company Law and employee participation in the SE (23.82); (3) Queen's Bench consider section 175 (13.53); (4) Christmas Procrastination (31.5); and (5) Hydrodan Corby v Hydrodam Corby (13.29). So views per month published Christmas Procrastination jumps to the second most popular with the others all moving down one accordingly except for the European Company Law post staying put at 1.

So what I conclude from this is people seem to be interested in European Company Law and cartoons. The popularity of my post on the case of Hydrodan/Hydrodam also evidences that I was not the only one confused as to how it should be cited and spelt. Perhaps most importantly of all my blog appears as the 10th search result for the phrase "European Company Law". Typing in my own name my blog now appears as the 3rd result. I see this as some sort of achievement as I remember searching before I established this blog and I certainly did not even appear on the first page.

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